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7 results

Tags: blue-green algae

Views: 108
Last Modified

January 30, 2019

Description

Cyanobacteria (also referred to as blue-green algae) are common photosynthetic bacteria that live in surface waters. Under favorable conditions, such as warm water and high nutrient content, these bacteria can form nuisance “blooms”. The presence of blooms in recreational water causes unpleasant...


Views: 35
Last Modified

September 1, 2015

Description

Cyanobacteria, often known as blue-green algae, are well adapted to growth in alkaline, nutrient-rich water bodies. During calm conditions, they can congregate near the water’s surface. These “blooms” are unsightly and produce objectionable odors, and can also induce skin irritation, itchiness...


Views: 31
Last Modified

September 1, 2014

Description

Harmful blue-green algae (toxic cyanobacteria) blooms in surface water are prevalent in Alberta. The presence of blue-green algae in recreational water causes unpleasant aesthetics, and exposure to some toxin-producing blue-green algae may pose potential health risks. There have been increased...


Views: 13
Last Modified

August 1, 2010

Description

Alberta’s nutrient-rich lakes and reservoirs often experience blooms of cyanobacteria (a.k.a. blue-green algae) during summer and early fall. Common species of cyanobacteria can produce potent liver and/or nerve toxins. Cyanotoxin monitoring was incorporated into Alberta’s Integrated Lake and...


Views: 7
Last Modified

January 1, 2008

Description

When cyanobacteria grow profusely and congregate, they make lake water look like pea soup. This phenomenon is called a bloom. Alberta has more than 100 species of cyanobacteria, ranging from tiny cells invisible to the naked eye to large species that look like fine grass clippings, small...


Views: 20
Last Modified

January 1, 2008

Description

Alberta's nutrient-rich lakes, ponds and reservoirs can support blooms of blue-green algae, scientifically known as cyanobacteria, some of which can produce toxins hazardous to people, pets, livestock and wildlife.


Views: 7
Last Modified

August 24, 2006

Description

Surface waters contain surface-active agents or surfactants that lessen the surface tension of waters. Diminished surface tension allows air bubble to persist at the water’s surface. Vigorous mixing of surface water generates bubbles that build up as foam.