All Resources

Common buckwheat

Description

Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is thought to have originated in central and western China from a wild Asian species Fagropyrum cymosum. It has been cultivated in China for over 1,000 years, and was brought to Europe during the Middle Ages. Buckwheat, as well as other grain species, accompanied the colonists to the New World. The Scots coined the word ìbuckwheatî from two AngloSaxon terms, boc(beech) and whoet(wheat). The word beech was used since the fruit of the plant was similar to that of beechnut. It was called wheat because the grain of buckwheat was used in the same way as wheat. This term is somewhat ironic since buckwheat does not belong to the grass family and is not considered a "true" cereal.

Updated

July 1, 2001

Tags
buckwheat field crops grain crops

Title and publication information

Type
Fact Sheet
Series Title

Agri-facts

Extent

6 pages

Frequency

Once

Publisher / Creator Information

Publisher

Agriculture, Food, and Rural Development (1992-2006)

Place of Publication

Edmonton

Subject Information

Topic
Agriculture

Resource Dates

Date Created

2001-07-01

Date Added

2015-12-10T21:26:24.004851

Date Modified

2001-07-01

Date Issued

2001-07-01

Audience information

Identifiers

AGDEX number

118/20-2

NEOS catalogue key

2551720

Usage / Licence

Contact

Contact Name

Agriculture and Forestry

Contact Email

duke@gov.ab.ca